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Redirecting C++ Truths feed

Dear readers,

Thanks for your continued interest in the C++ Truths blog and a steady stream of feedback comments. For quite some time now, I'm interested in learning accurate statistics about the readers of this blog. Recently, I came across, FeedBurner, which seems to be a popular choice for centralized feed processing and maintaining feed analytics such as subscriber count, live hits and many more things. Therefore, I have decided to redirect all the future contents on C++ Truths blog to the CppTruths feed. Existing atom and rss feeds shall be discontinued soon. I encourage you to subscribe to the new feed source and help me find the real subscriber count. In return, I promise to be more regular and frequent in posting more C++ truths, which you love to read!!

- Sumant.

Comments

Raider said…
There is no need to discontinue old feed. Just check the special option in the Blogger config to auto-redirect old feed to FeedBurner.
xander345 said…
if you like c++ you can compile it online here: http://codecompiler.info/

32, 64 - windows & Linux - and more programming languages

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